​Taking in the Stranger


At a point in his ministry, Jesus identified with the stranger among others -- the hungry, thirsty and prisoner -- the people whose lives indicated some sort of social or economic disconnectedness.

Jesus came to show people how to belong with God and each other. Sometimes that relational notion is inappropriately set apart from the way Christians think of justice, but they are closely collected. Justice means doing the right thing as well as restoring broken relationships.

For the believer, the love of justice arises from life with God; it is a by-product and is, therefore, an indicator of holiness encountering sinfulness and holiness winning in the end. It is not, as cable news might suggest with flashy graphics and loud voices, to be bought and sold at political whim. It is far too alive for that.

Like the sap from a great sugar maple indicating the nature of its tree, the sweet richness of our just actions indicate something about our Creator, our Originator that is altogether greater than the sweetness itself.

The Christian Life Commission's ISAAC Project will host a seminar on basic immigration law June 1-5 in San Antonio for churches, non profits, and even legal professionals who want to learn how to help immigrants obtain legal status in the U.S.

Immigrants are potentially overlooked in the Western, Christian practice of good-deed doing.

The struggles of life in a new country are immense and are often tucked away in the pockets of men and women who feel they don't belong. In the narrative of the stranger's life, hidden from view for safe keeping with what hope brought them here, there is reason for disconnectedness and fear for vulnerability.

The immigrant's cause, though needs may vary, is not too different from anyone else's. Relationship. Whether that is with the local church, community, state or nation, Christians know a thing or two about renewing relationship.

ISAAC's Basic Immigration Law Summer Institute is a way to learn how to help restore people's relationships with the law.

Standing for the cause of the stranger, in that right, is not such foreign idea.