Walk the Way


The world is troubled. Riddled with confusion, violence, frustration, and divisiveness, there seems to be a general anxiety and irritability in the air. In the past week, I have heard multiple people express how overwhelming everything feels.

I get it. I feel the tension, too.

This past Saturday, I sat in a fellowship hall with twenty lovely people. The group was comprised of church members from First Baptist Church Covington, their pastor, Dr. Eric Black, a group of Baylor University’s Garland School of Social Work students, and Dr. Gaynor Yancey, Professor of Social Work and Director of the Center for Family and Community Ministries.

Throughout the morning, we discussed a series of questions that uncovered the heart of the church.

How has Jesus moved amidst this body of believers and where is He leading them to serve and relate to one another?

The morning was sweet—a time of reflection, prayerful planning, and celebration. In the midst of this process Dr. Yancey made a statement that I cannot get out of my mind: Walk the Way.

She explained that before believers were called Christians, they were called followers of the Way -- meaning the way of Jesus Christ.

For example, in Acts 9:2 prior to his conversion experience, Saul looks for “anyone who belonged to the Way, men or women” to capture.

Today, we have the opportunity to walk the Way, just like the early church.

In the course of discussion at FBC Covington, we frequently returned to the theme of love. We shared how experiencing love—from God and others—transforms us individually and collectively.

When we really have hope in Jesus and take His life and death seriously, it changes the way we think and believe and act. We cannot continue in our own way. God became a person and came to earth and if we take Him seriously, things have to be different.

As we walk the Way of Christ today:

Let’s not be afraid when the Way seems counter-cultural.
Let’s not be afraid when the Way brings the familiar into question.
Let’s not be afraid when the Way means to stay quiet and listen.
Let’s not be afraid when the Way means to speak with truth and grace.
Let’s not be afraid when the Way compels us to put on love — radical love.
Let’s not be afraid to walk the Way together.