April 2018


BENDICE ESTOS ALIMENTOS: UNA PERSPECTIVA BÍBLICA


Él pudo haberse sentido insignificante. Era tan solo un niño de camino a casa con una canasta con el almuerzo de su familia: cinco panes pequeños y dos pescados.

Andrés, uno de los discípulos de Jesús, vio el insignificante almuerzo y preguntó: “…pero ¿qué es esto para tanta gente?” Me imagino que el chico se peguntó: “¿Cómo puedo marcar una diferencia?”

Y es entonces que el Salvador entra en escena.

“Tráiganmelos acá—les dijo Jesús. Y mandó a la gente que se sentara sobre la hierba, Tomó los cinco panes y los dos pescados y, mirando al cielo, los bendijo. Luego partió los panes y se los dio a los discípulos, quienes los repartieron a la gente”.

Todos comieron

 hasta quedar satisfechos, y los discípulos

 recogieron doce canastas

 llenas de pedazos que sobraron. Los que comieron fueron unos cinco mil hombres, sin contar a las mujeres y a los niños 

(Mateos 14:18-21, NVI).

...

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From Revolving Door to Highway of Redemption: The Church’s Response to 'Second Chance Month'


By Caleb Seibert

This month, the Christian Life Commission joined Gov. Greg Abbott and several groups to declare April “Second Chance Month” for formerly incarcerated individuals. Second Chance Month is an opportunity to highlight the challenges of formerly incarcerated individuals and their families and to share stories of redemption for those who have successfully overcome their criminal pasts.  

Nearly 70,000 people are released from Texas state prisons every year, but most churches have little to no interaction with them. These people and their families often face a mountain of obstacles to re-entry ranging from work barriers and criminal debt to the deep stigmatization that comes with their past experiences.

Research by Lifeway Publishing in Nashville seems to echo this sentiment. After polling 1,000 Protestant churches, Lifeway found that 31 percent said no former inmates attended their church, 36 percent said one or two former inmates attended, and only 33 percent indicated three or more former inmates attending their church.

Hebrews 13:3 says to “remember those who are in prison, as though you were in prison with them.” How can Christians remember those who are in prison and those who have been released?

Here are four practical suggestions for ministry . . ...

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Texas Baptists to honor Dr. Ken Coffee and Dr. Virginia Connally with Legacy Awards


Each year, deep in the heart of Texas, Texas Baptists meet on the first Sunday in June at the historic Independence Baptist Church to honor individuals who have represented Texas Baptists exceedingly well...

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Choosing the right social media platform for your church


Today, churches have access to the largest and most diverse mission field, with people from nearly every continent, age group 

and cultural background. In Matthew 10, Jesus sent out his disciples to share the Good News, and we have the same mission today - just with more advanced tools...

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How to turn everyday talks into Gospel conversations


As a pastor’s kid, Victor Rodriguez remembers spending Sunday afternoons at the park with his dad and a handful of friends looking for opportunities to share the Gospel. “I caught the ‘evangelism bug’ at a young age,” Rodriguez, pastor of Life Church in San Antonio, recalled.

While street evangelism is one method of starting Gospel-centered conversations, Rodriguez has utilized many different strategies throughout his ministry. To Rodriguez, evangelism is important because it is what the Lord has called believers to do.

“We live in a time today that our culture is resisting Christ and what the Lord has in store, but it is...

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Cómo volver conversaciones diarias en conversaciones del Evangelio


Como hijo de pastor, Víctor Rodríguez recuerda pasar los domingos en la tarde en el parque con su papá y un grupo de amigos buscando oportunidades para compartir el Evangelio. “Se me pegó el “virus del Evangelio” temprano cuando era pequeño”, recuerda Rodríguez, pastor de Life Church en San Antonio.

A pesar de que el evangelismo en la calle es un método para iniciar conversaciones centradas en el Evangelio, Rodríguez ha utilizado muchas estrategias diferentes durante su ministerio. Para Rodríguez, el evangelismo es importante porque es a lo que el Señor ha llamado a los creyentes.

“Vivimos en un tiempo hoy cuando nuestra cultura...

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Your guide to reaching your community


“We think of going overseas to go to the places that are hostile to the Gospel, but even in our own world here there are places that are against a kingdom mindset,” ...

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Sharing your faith in different settings


When Jesus commanded his followers in Matthew 28 to go and make disciples, it was a call to share the Gospel with all people. No matter the context in which you find yourself, through prayer, submission to the Holy Spirit’s promptings and obedience to the word of God, opportunities to share the Gospel can abound. Here are some different contexts and key factors to consider when sharing your faith...

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Texas Baptists hosts Foster Care Summit to address immediate needs in Texas


Texas Baptists leadership hosted a Foster Care Summit on Mon., Apr. 16 to discuss the foster care crisis in Texas and seek ways for partnering churches and ministries to get involved. Opening the meeting, Executive Director David Hardage discussed the escalating crisis over the past few years and his desire to see Texas Baptists join together to make a difference...

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Bringing Christ to the Hispanic community


It’s always wise to approach the Gospel from a person’s social and cultural context, which is why Roland Lopez specializes in evangelizing to the Hispanic community...

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Project:Start launches Refugee Life Upgrade


Project:Start, a refugee resource center supported by Texas Baptists, works to connect refugees in Dallas with the resources they need to find stability. Currently, thousands of refugees live within just a three-mile stretch of the North Dallas neighborhood called Vickery Meadow where over 30 different languages are spoken...

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Texas Baptist CLC joins with Prison Fellowship to recognize April as Second Chance Month


The Texas Baptist Christian Life Commission has partnered with Prison Fellowship and more than 150 other organizations to recognize April as Second Chance Month, in remembrance of the 65 million people with a criminal record with limited access to education, jobs and other opportunities...

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Human trafficking ministry, done in humility, flows from Jesus’ commands


By Abby Hopkins

I have always wanted to be a world changer. Even now I am constantly reminded of this goal at my university, where our motto is, “What starts here changes the world.”

I believe God has given me this desire for change and justice in the world for a reason, and I am so thankful for the passions He has placed in my heart. Lately, God has caused me to desire a platform of change that centers on Him, rather than on myself.

Over Spring Break, I traveled to New York City with other college students from my church. It was a large group, but we were split into breakout teams with specific focuses for the week. My group’s focus was anti-human trafficking, so we met with three different non-profit organizations that work to end trafficking.

One of the primary lessons God taught me throughout the trip was the need for Christians to love people in a way that prevents them from being exploited. Traffickers target the vulnerable. People who are often overlooked, unloved, and underserved are often the most vulnerable. So, one of the best things we can do for people is love and serve them.

Jesus spoke to this point in Mark 9:35 when He said, “Anyone who wants to be first must be the very last, and the servant of all.&rdquo...

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Bless This Meal: A Biblical Perspective


By Ali Corona

He may have felt insignificant -- a young boy walking home with a basket of lunch for his family -- five small loaves and two fish.

With a glance toward heaven and a heartfelt prayer, Jesus multiplied a few parcels into a lavish feast for a crowd that was hungry for spiritual and physical nourishment.

All four gospels recount this important moment in history. The sight of the unseen Kingdom colliding with the world must have made a deep impression on each of their hearts and minds. 

Today, an estimated 795 million people around the world are undernourished. In Texas, 1 in 6 families are unable to put meals on their tables everyday. Hunger, both physical and spiritual, is devastating...

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Texas Baptists partners with BGAV to host Pastoral Training Event


For the first time, Texas Baptists Chaplaincy Relations is adding an additional opportunity for their annual Pastoral Training Event, to be held in Williamsburg, Virginia. The event, typically held in the fall in Texas, allows chaplains to maintain a high level of proficiency in pastoral care ministry while giving them a time for spiritual renewal, continuing education, networking and fellowship...

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CONFERENCIA MIQUEAS 6:8 ANIMA A LOS CREYENTES A AMAR AL PRÓJIMO Y MOSTRAR LA SANTIDAD DE DIO


SUGAR LAND—Una diversa multitud de más de 300 participantes se unió para alabar y recibir el llamado a vivir una relación verdadera con Dios, consigo misma, con otros y con la creación en la Conferencia Miqueas 6:8 de la Comisión de Vida Cristiana de los Bautistas de Texas el 23 y 24 de marzo en SugarLand, Texas.

“Esperamos que nuestro trabajo sea guiado por las palabras del profeta Miqueas de hacer justicia, amar la misericordia y caminar humildemente delante de Dios”, dijo Jacob West, presidente del Consejo de Comisionados de la Comisión de Vida Cristina y pastor de la iglesia FirstBaptistChurch de Plainview.

Corbett enfatiza el papel de la justicia en el alivio de la pobreza

“Somos creados para conocerlo y ser conocidos por Él”, dijo Steve Corbett, Profesor Asociado de Desarrollo Comunitario en elCovenantCollege, durante su conferencia del viernes por la mañana. “Fuimos creados para ser adoradores. Somos portadores de la imagen divina. Esto lo vuelve a usted un ser precioso”....

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TRIBUTO A MLK: PREDICÓ Y LUCHÓ CONTRA LA VIOLENCIA HASTA SU MUERTE VIOLENTA


El 4 de abril se celebra el 50th aniversario del asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr. La Comisión le pidió a varios bautistas de Texas que escribieran sobre aspectos del ministerio y la influencia del Dr. King. Este es el séptimo artículo.

Por Ferrell Foster

Existe siempre el riesgo de que una persona no violenta sea consumida por la violencia, especialmente cuando esa persona desafía injusticias culturales bien arraigadas, tal como le sucedió a Martin Luther King, Jr.

Ni una bomba, ni puñetazos ni palos lo detuvieron; pero una bala sí. 

El cuarto principio de la no violencia de King era el de una “disposición a aceptar el sufrimiento sin represalias, aceptar golpes del oponente sin regresárselos”. King nunca se defendió físicamente, aun y cuando la brutalidad y la falta de respeto aumentaron. Muchos querían que lo hiciera,mas no lo hizo.

La lucha contra la violencia del Dr. King nació de su fe cristiana. Peter J. Paris afirma que la filosofía de King no era algo nuevo para la iglesia afroamericana. El “concepto de la no violencia promulgado por Martin Luther King Jr. no fue algo ajeno a las iglesias afroamericanas…. De hecho, King solamente estaba explicando e implementando el modo tradicional de protesta practicado por largo tiempo por las iglesias afroamericanas en la tradición cristiana afroamericana&rdquo...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: ¿Y AHORA A DÓNDE? HACIA EL SUEÑO DE JUSTICIA PARA TODOS DE KING


El 4 de abril marcó el 50th aniversario del asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr. La Comisión le pidió a varios miembros de la familia bautista de Texas que escribieran sobre aspectos del ministerio y sobre la influencia del Dr. King. Este es el sexto artículo.

Por Kathryn Freeman

El 4 de abril de 1968 Martin Luther King, Jr. fue asesinado en el balcón del Motel Lorraine en Memphis. El Dr. King había ido a Memphis a unirse a los trabajadores sanitarios afroamericanos de la ciudad en su lucha por mejores condiciones de trabajo y salarios luego de que dos de sus trabajadores murieran aplastados por un camión.

Los trabajadores sanitarios trabajaban de tiempo completo y aun así dependían de programas gubernamentales para mantener a sus familias. El Dr. King se unió a estos trabajadores en su lucha por la justicia y la dignidad económicas, porque “la injusticia en cualquier lugar es una amenaza a la justicia en todo lugar”.

El Dr. King dio su vida por la lucha contra la desigualdad en reverencia profunda al mandato que encontramos en Miqueas 6:8: “hacer justicia, amar la misericordia y caminar humildemente ante Dios”. Fue el conductor principal de la lucha por la justicia y galvanizó a personas de todas las edades y razas para andar junto a él hacia el cumplimiento de la promesa americana de libertad y justicia para todos...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: EL AMOR A LOS DEMÁS ES EL FUNDAMENTO


El 4 de abril marcó el 50th aniversario del asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr. La Comisión le pidió a varios miembros de la familia bautista de Texas que escribieran sobre aspectos del ministerio e influencia del Dr. King. Este es el quinto artículo.

Por John D. Ogletree, Jr.

Una de las muestrasmás grandes de amor en la historia de los Estados Unidos fue la que se llevó a cabo a través de la vida de Martin Luther King, Jr. La ironía de esta afirmación es que durante el Movimiento de los Derechos Civiles el Dr. King fue la persona más odiada en el país; sin embargo, el amor fue su antídoto contra el odio.

El Dr. King luchó por la igualdad, mas se opuso a la violencia. En 1960, en un discurso a estudiantes universitarios, ofreciócinco principios de la filosofía de la no violencia. El segundo hablade la ética del amor, y dice así:

“El segundo hecho básico en esta filosofía es el rechazo consistente a infligirheridas a otros. La más alta expresión de no infligir heridas es el amor. Este amor significa centrar nuestra atención en los sistemas malignos y no en quien perpetra el mal&rdquo...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: ‘SI YO NO ME DETENGO A AYUDAR A ESTE HOMBRE, ¿QUÉ SERÁ DE


Hoy, 4 de abril, se celebra el 50th aniversario del asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr. La Comisión le ha pedido a varios bautistas de Texas que escriban sobre aspectos del ministerio y la influencia del Dr. King. Este es el cuarto artículo.

Por Kyle Childress

“Soy un hombre”, decía el cartelón que llevaban los trabajadores sanitarios de Memphis, Tennessee, hace 50 años. Los trabajadores sanitarios estaban en huelga contra el Departamento de Obras Públicas de Memphis y demandaban que la ciudad los tratara como seres humanos. Todos eran afroamericanos y ganaban 65 centavos al día recogiendo y manejando camiones de basura en Memphis.

Un par de meses atrás, durante un aguacero, dos trabajadores, Echol Cole y Robert Walker, se refugiaron en la parte trasera del camión de basura para comer. Una  

falla eléctrica hizo que el compactador se encendiera, y compactó a los dos hombres junto con la basura y murieron. La injusticia de tal sistema acentuó el dolor y la tragedia cuando la ciudad se rehusó a compensar a sus familias. Once días después 1,300 trabajadores sanitarios abandonaron el trabajo. La razón de la protesta era una sencilla afirmación de que los trabajadores eran seres humanos y debían ser tratados con dignidad. No eran basura, y por eso los carteles decían: “Soy un hombre&rdquo...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: EL SIGNIFICADO DE COMUNIDAD


Hoy, 4 de abril, se celebra el 50o aniversario del asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr. La Comisión le ha pedido a varios miembros de la familia bautista de Texas que escriban sobre aspectos del ministerio y la influencia del Dr. King. Este es el tercer artículo.

Por Michael A. Evans, Sr.

Al conmemorar el 50º aniversario del brutal asesinato de Martin Luther King, Jr., debemos reconocer que su esperanza por una nación unificada continúa siendo un sueño que las personas del siglo XXI deben tratar de alcanzar.

El Dr. King estaba convencido de que el siguiente gran desafío que enfrentaba nuestra nación no era el racismo sino el clasismo. El hecho de que millones de personas en Estados Unidos fueran azotadas por el demonio de la pobreza y perseguidos por el fantasma de la insuficiencia alimentaria le causaba un malestar en su alma que provocaba perplejidad a algunos de sus más cercanos aliados.

Muchos de sus colegas sentían que la segregación y la separación social eran los asuntos más importantes del momento. El Dr. King comenzó a ver las causas de los derechos civiles desde una perspectiva más amplia. Para él la igualdad de salario, las condiciones laborales seguras y la igualdad de oportunidades de progreso eran tanto un asunto de “derechos civiles” como el permitir a los ciudadanos elegibles la oportunidad de votar...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: EL CORAZÓN DE LA PREDICACIÓN AFROAMERICANA, UNA PALABRA PROFÉTI


Por Joseph R. Fields

Martin Luther King, Jr., le demostró al mundo que podía encontrar el alma de un profeta en el corazón de la predicación afroamericana. El Dr. King sirvió a iglesias en Montgomery, Alabama y Atlanta por un corto tiempo (1954-1968), pero el impacto de sus predicaciones se extendió por todo el mundo y continúa haciéndolo.

En 1979, Henry H. Mitchell escribió: “Hace cincuenta años, se menospreciaba la tradición de la predicación afroamericana (o negra), era aún despreciada por la cultura occidental (o blanca) y, de hecho, por muchos intelectuales afroamericanos y algunos jóvenes y viejos de estilo radical.

La predicación afroamericana era vista como una explosión emocional no estructurada de retórica desinformada, carente de valor a las masas y relegada a la cultura en la que había nacido.

El mundo es más rico porque, por la voluntad de Dios, los sentimientos del pasado respecto a la predicación afroamericana han cambiado para bien. Mientras que la humanidad hace una pausa para reflexionar en la vida del Dr. King, nosotros no debemos perder de vista el hecho de que él ayudó a cambiar la percepción sobre la predicación afroamericana para que fuera aceptada y vista como una voz profética a la que Dios le ha dado aliento...

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TRIBUTO A MLK: DIOS ESTÁ OBRANDO EN LA HISTORIA


Por Tamiko Jones

Ministro bautista. Activista de derechos civiles. Instrumento de justicia. Mártir. Cristiano.

De todos los títulos usados para describir a Martin Luther King, Jr., uno debe considerar que el título preeminente es el de cristiano. El Dr. King dijo una vez:

“El cristianismo afirma que en el corazón de la realidad hay un Corazón con “c” mayúscula; es decir, un padre amoroso que obra a través de la historia para la salvación de sus hijos. El hombre no puede salvarse a sí mismo porque no es la medida de todas las cosas y la humanidad no es Dios. Atado a las cadenas de su propio pecado y su condición finita, el hombre necesita un Salvador”.

King reconoció la mano de Dios a través de la historia y que la historia entera llegaba a su punto culminante en la época en la que el Dr. King vivió...

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The reimagined ministry of the Gaston Christian Center


When Gaston Oaks Baptist Church faced the impending reality of closing its doors for good, leadership in the church sought to utilize the resources and property the Lord had given them to keep their ministry alive. The result was a reimagined ministry that would reach the nations right in their neighborhood. They named this new endeavor the Gaston Christian Center....

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Tribute to MLK: He preached, practiced nonviolence until his own violent death


April 4 marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence. This is the seventh article.

By Ferrell Foster

There is always the risk that a nonviolent person will be consumed by violence, especially when he or she is challenging long-held cultural injustices. Such was Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, fate.

A bomb, fists, and clubs did not stop him. A bullet did.

The fourth tenant of King’s nonviolence told of a “willingness to accept suffering without retaliation, to accept blows from the opponent without striking back.” King never retaliated physically, even though the brutality and disrespect mounted. Many wanted him to, but he didn’t...

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Tribute to MLK: Where do We Go From Here? Toward King’s Dream of Justice for All


April 4 marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence. This is the sixth article.

By Kathryn Freeman

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. Dr. King had come to Memphis to join the city’s black sanitation workers in their fight for better working conditions and better pay after two of their co-workers were crushed to death by a malfunctioning truck.

Sanitation workers were working full-time and still forced to rely on government programs to feed their families. Dr. King joined these workers in their fight for economic justice and dignity, because “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

Dr. King gave his life to the fight against inequality out a deep reverence for the command found in Micah 6:8, “to do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with God.” He was a drum major for justice, galvanizing people of all ages and races to walk with him toward fulfilling the American promise of freedom and justice for all.

Dr. King’s dream was born out of his study of Scripture and his work as a pastor at Dexter Avenue and Ebenezer Baptist churches. He frequently echoed the call of Amos to “let justice roll down like a river;” the words of Jesus, “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees. . . who have neglected the more important matters of the law -- justice, mercy and faithfulness;” and of the Apostle Paul’s “Macedonian call.” Dr. King’s notion of justice and equality and the Christian response to it is profoundly biblical...

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Tribute to MLK: Love for All Stands as the Foundation


April 4 marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence. This is the fifth article.

By John D. Ogletree, Jr.

One of the greatest demonstrations of love in American history came through the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. The irony of this statement is that during the Civil Rights Movement he was no doubt the most hated man in America. Love, however, was his antidote for hate.

Dr. King was a fighter for equality yet a proponent of nonviolence. In 1960, in a speech to college students, he gave five tenets on the philosophy of nonviolence. The second one speaks on the ethic of love. It states:

“A second basic fact in this philosophy is the consistent refusal to inflict injury upon another. The highest expression of non-injury is love. This love means that you center your attention on the evil system and not the evil doer.”

Twentieth century philosopher-theologian Josiah Royce founded the Fellowship of Reconciliation, of which King was a member. Royce coined the term, “The Beloved Community.” King popularized the term and gave it deeper meaning that was embraced by a broad group of people in the Civil Rights Movement. To King, the goal of the Beloved Community was to have a critical mass of people who would be committed to and trained in the philosophy of nonviolence.

The core value of the Beloved Community to Dr. King was agape love. ...

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Tribute to MLK: ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?’


Today, April 4, marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC has asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence. This is the fourth article.

By Kyle Childress

“I am a man,” said the signs carried by sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee, 50 years ago. Sanitation workers were on strike from the Memphis’ public works department demanding that the city treat them like human beings. All of them were black and most of them made 65 cents a day loading and driving the garbage trucks for the people of Memphis.

A couple of months before, during a major downpour, two workers, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, took shelter in the back of a sanitation truck to eat their lunch. An electrical malfunction caused the compactor to operate, compacting the men along with all of the garbage and killing them.

The injustice of such a system further underscored the grief and tragedy when the city refused to compensate their families. Eleven days later 1,300 black sanitation workers walked off the job. At the heart of the protest was the simple assertion that the workers were human beings and should be treated with the dignity of being human. They were not garbage. Hence, the signs, “I am a man.” . . .

That last night in Memphis, King preached, “And so the first question that the priest asked -- the first question that the Levite asked was, ‘If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?’ But then the Good Samaritan came by. And he reversed the question: ‘If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?’” King continued, “That’s the question before you tonight… Not, ‘If I stop to help this man in need, what will happen to me?’ The question is, ‘If I do not stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to them?’ That’s the question.”

That’s still the question...

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Leighton Flowers named new Evangelism Lead for Texas Baptists


Leighton Flowers was named Evangelism Lead for Texas Baptists on April 2. No stranger to Baptist life, Flowers has served on staff with the Convention since 2003, overseeing key evangelistic ministry initiatives including Super Summer, Youth Evangelism Conferences, Hot Hearts, See You At the Pole, [un]Apologetic conferences and more...

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Tribute to MLK: The Meaning of Community


Today, April 4, marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC has asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence. This is the third article.

By Michael A. Evans, Sr.

As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the brutal assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., we must acknowledge that his hopes for a unified nation continue to be a dream that the people of the 21st century must strive to attain.

Dr. King was adamant that the next great challenge to face our nation was not racism but classism. The fact that millions of people in the United States were stricken by the demon of poverty and the specter of food insufficiency haunted him and caused an uneasiness in his soul that would be perplexing to some of his closest allies. . . .

It was his final mission in life that led him to Memphis to trumpet the aforementioned causes on behalf of hard working black sanitation workers. He believed no person should be paid less because of their race or station in life.

The root of southern hatred was born out of a sense of social insecurity, a threat that one group would gain power over another. When one group feels as if it can only survive by suppressing the rights of others -- voting rights, rights to earn equal pay for equal work and the list goes on -- there will always be division and never community.

Community is defined as “the people with common interests living in a particular area.” As Dr. King noted in his book Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos to Community?, we are truly living in “one world house.” However separate our society and even our world, we live on an ever shrinking planet bound together by technology which places humanity in constant contact with diverse people groups on a daily basis...

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Missional communities produce life-change through Longhorn BSM


Sometimes UT gets assumed to be a godless place, but the reality is every day Jesus is engaging one of the 45,000 lost students with His Gospel and we get to watch that happen and we get to watch what people assume to be godless be incredibly glorifying...

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Tribute to MLK: God is at Work in History


April 4 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC has asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King’s ministry and influence.

By Tamiko Jones

Baptist minister. Civil rights activist. Drum major for justice. Martyr. Christian.

Of all the titles used to describe Martin Luther King, Jr., one should consider the preeminent title to be that of Christian. Dr. King once stated:

“Christianity affirms that at the heart of reality is a Heart, a loving Father who works through history for the salvation of His children.  Man cannot save himself, for man is not the measure of all things and humanity is not God. Bound by the chains of his own sin and finiteness, man needs a Savior.”

King recognized the hand of God throughout history and that everything in history led up to the time in which Dr. King lived. ...

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Missions in New York City – How God is Working in The Big Apple


For Spring Break this year, I decided to go to New York City. Not for a vacation or to sightsee, although I did get to do some of that, too. ...

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Tribute to MLK: The Heart of Black Preaching, a Prophetic Word


April 4 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The CLC has asked several Texas Baptists to write on aspects of Dr. King's ministry and influence.

By Joseph R. Fields

Martin Luther King, Jr., demonstrated to the world that you find the soul of a prophet at the heart of black preaching.

Dr. King served churches in Montgomery, Alabama, and Atlanta only a short time (1954-1968), but the impact of his preaching stretched around the world and continues in time.

In 1979, Henry H. Mitchell wrote, “Fifty years ago, the African American (or Black) preaching tradition was looked down upon, even scorned by Western (or White) culture and indeed by many black intellectuals and some self-styled radicals young and old.”

Black preaching was viewed as an unstructured, emotional outburst of uninformed rhetoric, devoid of value to the masses and relegated to the culture into which it was born.

The world is richer because, by the will of God, the sentiments of yesteryear regarding black preaching have taken a turn for the better. As humanity takes time to pause and to reflect upon Dr. King’s life, it should not escape our attention that he helped to turn the tide for black preaching to be accepted and to be seen as a prophetic voice to which God has given breath...

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